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Providing support to Hull’s seafaring community

This week, we’re putting the spotlight on Hull Trinity House, a local charity established in the 14th century with the intent to support needy seafarers and their families.

This week, we’re putting the spotlight on Hull Trinity House, a local charity established in the 14th century with the intent to support needy seafarers and their families.

Originally starting out as a religious guild that provided support for seamen in need, by the 18th century it had gained several important responsibilities, including management of the Hull harbour. After the Humber Conservancy Act of 1852 took away most of those responsibilities, the guild has continued its work as a charity and an education provider right up to the present day.

The Trinity House Academy was the very first marine school to be established back in February 1787, starting out with only 36 boys enrolled. Formerly located in what is currently Zebedee’s Yard, the school occupied that site for around 150 years, before converting to Academy Status in April 2012 and moving to George Street the following year.

Trinity House maintains a strong link with the academy, with board members and trustees figuring largely on the Board of Governors. The charity assists the academy with financial aid wherever possible. Staff and pupils of the academy still honour the traditions placed by their forefathers, such as the ringing of the bell, the three Sunday Services at Hull Minster each year, prize giving awards and the annual sports gala.

As well as their continuous help with the academy and the work they do to support seafarers, the Trinity House charity also operates a number of rest homes called Alms Houses. Located on Anlaby High Road, the homes are available for those in receipt of a Trinity House charity grant, over 60 and retired. Officially opened in late 1951, the home consists of 56 one-bedroom flats, eight two-bedroom bungalows and the rest home, located in the middle of the plot. The centre has a common room, dining room, private offices, a laundrette and a space for hairdressers, manicurists, and chiropodists to practice their crafts.

Trinity House is always around when Hull needs a helping hand. Last year, the charity helped to transform Hull Minster by sponsoring more than two dozen chairs to support their development project. This helped to transform the church into an open and flexible space for worship and a wide range of cultural, social and community events. Trinity House and Hull Minster have had strong affiliations with each other since the 14th century, when the people of Hull banded together to offer assistance to people in times of hardship.

"The generosity of the wonderful people at Trinity House is humbling,” says Reverend Canon Dr Neal Barnes, vicar of Hull Minster.

Find out more about Hull Trinity House and the work that they do.

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